A Tribute to Nancy Ahlswede


As I stepped into my new office in September of 2013, I began to look around the office to get a sense of who was here before. It was a surreal feeling to walk among binders and binders filled with memos, emails and past magazines that were once under the authority of someone I knew had the hearts of this membership. After a few days of getting to know the staff and talking with some of the board members it suddenly dawned on me that I was not alone in this process. I was about to walk into the footsteps of a legend in the multifamily industry.

As the months went by and I began to meet more and more people, the comments started with this statement, “Oh, you are the new Nancy”. But I knew immediately that there was more to this Association than just being the “new Nancy.” Nancy left a legacy that will never be matched. She was a force to be reckoned with. It was clear that her devotion to this industry went beyond her position as Executive Director—it was her passion. When I finally met Nancy, we talked for close to two hours and when I left that meeting with her, I knew that I could always go to her to ask questions and get advice. As with anything in life, when the opportunity is not there any longer you always wish you had more time to ask just one more question or learn just one more tidbit that will help your organization.

Over the next few pages it is only fitting that we share some thoughts that come directly from those who loved and admired her the most. So, in her memory, we share these tributes.


Ron Kingston was honored to give the eulogy at Nancy’s funeral. Here are a few excerpts from the eulogy:


Was a master collaborator who was result-driven. People from all walks of life would conclude that the solution that was reached when Nancy was involved in negotiations of an issue was always the best possible.

Had organizational skills that assured success. Just a few years ago, she was hospitalized during the annual trade show. That did not interfere with making the trade show extremely successful. This skill was passed on to her daughter, Katherine.

At times, I wondered if they should have considered installing a hide a bed or futon in the office due to the number of hours they would work.

Was the eternal optimist. Just three weeks ago she and I talked about her plans for her 70th birthday party which would be on a boat in the Long Beach harbor. And during that same conversation she was planning on how she would resume being with her family, Larry, Katherine, Chip, Jennifer and the three grandchildren—Cooper (who loves video games), Donovan (who loves sports such as flag football) and Nixon (who was just baptized).

Has a legacy that can never be forgotten. Each one of us should always remember that she would push forward during extremely difficult and challenging times.

Michael D. Pintek, Board Emeritus
We in the legal profession would refer to Nancy as a “Force Majeure” (a superior or irresistible force). The small acorn that was the Association 28 years ago, through the work and efforts of the officers, board of directors and membership, who were the roots, under the guidance, administration and dedication of Nancy, who was the lignin that held it all together, has grown into a mighty oak tree. Nancy’s star shined bright on all of us while enriching our lives and illuminating the path in front of us.

Bob Luskin
I had the pleasure of working with Nancy for over 20 years. Nancy wan an amazing person. She has made the Apartment Association what it is today. Nancy will be missed.

Allen & Mary Ann Wood
Nancy lives on in our hearts and memories. Not only as a great lady who led the Apartment Association for so many years, but also as a very dear friend.

Sharon Coughlin
Nancy was definitely destined to be a leader of this organization that so generously devotes their time and energy in fighting for the rights of people in the rental housing industry both for owners as well as for tenants. Her amazing knowledge provided anyone interested in seeking a career in property management the understanding of how great it truly is to SERVE people. I was always amazed by her as a woman, a great mother and most of all a great leader to be inspired by.

Pat Thornton
I was shocked and saddened by this news. Brian and I always felt so welcome at the monthly meetings. She always had a ready smile and enthusiasm and the ability to spread hope and joy!

Grace Velazquez, GGB Properties, Inc.
Despite being a “new-comer” to the industry, Nancy took the time to get to know me and showed genuine care. Nancy’s passion was contagious and I hope that her legacy will live on.

Rebecca Moffett, A Better Property Management, and Past Board President, and Board Emeritus
Nancy was dedicated to landlords and their property rights and she always put them first. She was smart, well known, connected and knew how to work a crowd or a council meeting. She had intuitive gifts that were unparalleled with anyone I have ever known. She had great command of her job, of legislative bills and happenings, of other Asso ciations’ trials and tribulations, etc. Nancy knew everyone, never forgot a name and was a brilliant strategist. When Nancy spoke, you listened. She made sure everyone was well informed on all the issues and she listened to people to make sure that the board members could arrive at a consensus on most issues. She held everyone to a high standard which everyone wanted to meet and it was easy as we followed the lead of Nancy and the high bar she set for herself. She praised everyone on their good deeds, thanked volunteers with certificates and personalized plaques and paperweights. No matter what you volunteered for, you were acknowledged in many ways.

Sandra Feliciano, Broker
She was the reason I attended the CAM courses and received my designation. I appreciate all that she did for our industry. She will truly be missed.

Wendy Henning
What a “gal”...she made me feel like a long-time friend. I will miss her personality and gracious nature.

Virginia (Ginny) Ball
I so appreciate Nancy’s help in coming to Whittier on many evenings to help me start the Whittier Apartment Association. It is still going strong, but it is with her help that we got it “off the ground!”

Alejandra Kostuch
Nancy, the lady that always had answers no matter what it was about.

Coy Herring, Past President and Director Emeritus Through Nancy’s tireless and brilliant leadership we endured, survived and flourished. Through her abundant friendship we all were rewarded.

John & “Bub” Pratt, Past
Board President (1993-1994) I remember when the Board asked her to be Executive Officer. I believe that was 1991 when Phil Dauk was President of the Board and I was Vice President. Nancy was a tremendous help to our Association. She wore many hats for us as editor of the magazine, legislative advocate and executive officer. I don’t know how she did it all. Not to mention herding 20 or so cats (Board of Directors). She is certainly missed by all. Our sympathy to Larry and the family.

Evelyn Arnold
What a loss to our industry and to the world! Nancy was one of a kind who was always fighting for the rights of the small apartment owners and others. May she rest in peace.

Kelly Geonetta,
R.E.M.S., Inc. To all the people that she touched with her smile. To her family and friends. Thank you.

Gina Trinidad
Thank you Nancy for all of what you have done and for all the times you fought for us. You will be remembered and prayed for.

This has been a wonderful 28 years journey with you. It has been said that a person who is passionate about what they do, never works a day in his/her life. I thank you for the opportunity to be one of those people.”
Nancy Ahlswede, 2012

When you wake up tomorrow and each day following think of what you learned from Nancy. Think of what you will do that she taught you that you will continue to do. Let her inspire us to do better. Let her energy, ability, and forward movement not wane.

Larry would often times say “One of the things that I loved about Nancy was that she was the smartest woman that I ever knew.” – Ron Kingston

Carrying the Message


Mark your calendars and make your travel arrangements for the 2017 NAA Capitol Conference and Lobby Day which will take place March 7 and 8 in Washington, D.C. The Capitol Conference will start after lunch on March 7 with an issues orientation and advocacy training session. We will train you to be an effective advocate for the apartment industry through this high-impact programming, including a presentation by presidential historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Doris Kearns Goodwin, our keynote speaker. Both the House and Senate will be in session on Lobby Day, giving everyone an opportunity to connect with their members of Congress. Remember, NAA’s goal is to reach all 535 Congressional offices—that’s 435 Representatives and 100 Senators. There are also more than 50 new members in the 115th Congress making this Lobby Day especially important.

In 2016 NAA focused on three issues during the Capitol Conference—mitigating “drive-by” Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) lawsuits, streamlining the Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher program and opening up more private sector options for flood insurance. We scored a victory on Section 8 vouchers with passage of the Housing Opportunity through Modernization Act that eliminated much of the bureaucracy around the inspections process.

We were not as successful on the other two issues though our preferred legislation on those topics advanced a great way towards passage. The issues remain critical today so we are reprising our focus on ADA lawsuits and flood insurance at the 2017 Capitol Conference and Lobby Day. The effort on flood insurance has added importance this year as the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) will expire in September. Without the NFIP apartment owners and operators would have few, costprohibitive options for flood insurance. This program must be extended and improved.

Added to the list of issues for the 2017 Capitol Conference is tax reform. Back when we all thought Hilary Clinton would be the next President of the United States, the odds of tax reform actually happening were low. There was simply too wide of a gulf between Secretary Clinton and the GOP. Those odds are now flipped on their head. Reform of the tax code was a hot topic during the campaign and President-elect Trump’s team has stated it is a “200-day” priority after the repeal and/or replacement of the Affordable Care Act.

Meanwhile, House Republicans have crafted a proposal they call a “blueprint” for tax reform which suggests some fairly radical changes to the code, including areas impacting real estate. Their goals are generally the same or similar to those of the President-elect but it’s the details that matter. That will be the first level of negotiation.

A critical decision the majority powers must make is what kind of bill they want to pass – the preferred Republican package or a negotiated bill that includes Democratic priorities. Recently, the concept of durability has come up a lot in this context.

Specifically, according to advisors close the President-elect, Congress should take a bipartisan approach to tax reform (like was done in 1986) so that whatever bill is passed survives beyond the GOP majority. The obvious comparison is to the Affordable Care Act—a bill passed on party lines without a single GOP vote that now is almost certain to be repealed or significantly weakened. The President-elect wants a legacy which demands a bipartisan approach.

No matter what route tax reform takes, the apartment industry will have to be involved. Anyone who was in the industry when the Tax Act of 1986 was passed will remember how significant – positive and negative—this legislation was for commercial real estate. This new round of reform is shaping up to be potentially as significant with a lot of specific implications for our industry. Literally everyone who develops, owns or manages apartments or who works for a company that does will be impacted by tax reform. As such, everyone needs to be involved. The table is being set and it’s up to you if you want to be a guest or a main course.

Your lives are very busy and it can be extremely challenging to cram one more task onto an already overflowing list. The good news is that NAA now makes it easy to do your part for the industry. Our new Advocacy365 App puts Congress in the palm of your hand. It’s your year-round indispensable tool that’s packed with resources to keep your finger on the legislative pulse of the apartment industry. The app’s key elements include talking points and fact sheets on the issues, the ability to directly communicate with your legislators, Congressional directories, year-round mobile action alerts sent directly to you and much more. Download the app now and take apartment advocacy with you wherever you go.

Great advocacy means carrying the message to your elected officials all year long. But, the NAA Capitol Conference and Lobby Day is the once-a-year opportunity for our advocates in Washington, D.C., to show the Congress the power of the industry. Go to the NAA website ( to register and talk with your local affiliated association about being part of the effort. I know you care about the future of your industry, your business and your bottom line and want to be part of our effort to make the voice of the apartment industry heard.

January 2018


Welcome to 2018!! Whether you celebrated the holidays at the beach, with friends, family or as a volunteer, I hope that it was a peaceful and happy time.

With each passing year I am grateful for my family and this year was no exception, but the one thing that touched me most was the realization that my kids are growing up fast. My son will be a senior next year and my daughter will begin her high school experience. As a mother, of course, I still think of them as “little ones” and can’t imagine a time when I will not have them with me. It is at the very least a bittersweet thought, but one I celebrate as I watch them grow up.

As for AACSC, I am thinking about much the same thing. What does the future hold for us, how will we come together to respond to ongoing threats that pervade our industry? The simple solution is to allow builders the opportunity to build, to let supply and demand do the job it is intended to do, and to educate our tenants that regulations and government are not the way to a positive solution. Building takes time and educating our tenants is just one way we can inform them of the unintended consequences that they are not aware of. Until then, AACSC will stay on top of the ongoing issues and just ask for your participation and involvement when called for. Thank you for your membership and keep the calls coming so we can remain informed.

But what is in store for 2018 you might ask. Well, be ready for more education classes and more opportunities to get involved. This is also the best time of year to let us know where and how you would like to connect with AACSC. We have our Ambassadors team, Golf Committee, Education Committee, Social Media team and our Local Legislative team all waiting for new members to join and help AACSC get even more connected within our territory. We are also adding a new location for AACSC meetings in Whittier and continue to meet each month in Redondo Beach so be sure to check our weekly newsletter, The Beacon, for all the latest news.

We hope that you will join us this year at the Virginia Country Club on January 26 for our Annual Installation for our 2018 Board of Directors and President, Michael Pollack. This must-attend event is a great opportunity to have a wonderful night out at a beautiful location—call Jeannie in our office for more information and to make your reservations.

Finally, I want to thank my staff and partners whom you speak to whenever you call AACSC: Donna, Terri, Tom, Rachael, Jeannie, Sophia, Brenda and Oliver. Every single one of them is dedicated to helping you get the answers you need for your business. We hope you are telling all your multifamily friends that AACSC is the only place to join and get involved. See you soon and may your month be filled with joy as we begin a brand new year.

A Fresh Page


Wow — what a great, but fast year 2017 was! It is hard to believe all that has happened last year, and we expect even more, bigger and crazier things again for this great year we have ahead of us. Like my mentor once explained, starting the New Year (or even a new day) with a fresh page and a clean slate, people can put what we want on the pages of our futures, which gives us unique opportunities that other animals on this planet are not offered—a goose must fly south for the winter. Why? Because it’s a goose! If a tree doesn’t like where it lives, it cannot pack up and move. We, on the other hand, have been given the dignity of choice.

It is my hope that all of us have taken the time to reflect upon last year and then create a new and improved plan for this year—not just a wish list, but sound goals that are achievable, and at the same time will stretch and grow us. When we do this with our own lives, we can do it in our businesses, communities and beyond. A great way to learn how to better plan and execute new plans in our own lives and communities is to get involved with our AACSC Committees that are run by our all-volunteer Board of Directors. Not only is this a great way to get plugged into the community and to help others as well as to really learn how to “preserve, protect, and enhance” the rental housing industry in Southern California, but also a way to show you how a focused group of people come up with and execute great ideas! Luckily, we are not trees who are stuck somewhere in the snow year ‘round, stuck in a constant lightning storm—or even stuck as a restroom for a pack of wolves in a forest—we are all here by choice in beautiful SoCal and each of us has a responsibility to leave everything better than how we found it, and we do that by becoming part of a great team complete with leaders and mentors.

One great lesson I have learned about uniting on the same front and becoming a team, is that as neighbors — especially in this country—we always want to do what is best and what is right, but we tend to differ on how we define that or get there. I want to reassure everyone that things that will make ourselves, and our industry, businesses and region better are your ideas, your courage to stand up and respectfully say something if it doesn’t feel right, and your involvement in your community.

We need you and we need your voice, your help, and your ideas. Please reach out and let us know your interests — we have so much to choose from. From our local and state legislative committees, trade show and membership committees, to education, golf tournament fundraising, and Political Action committees—we have a little something for all interests. Pick one of interest to you and let’s partner up. Everyone here will be heard, respected, listened to, and given a chance.

As a great help to your training, remember that there is no better way to school yourself and your teams than to get into the top of the line classes that AACSC offers. The prices are right, and the info is priceless. Learn how to keep compliant of the law and still be able to care for your residents and properties.

Regularly check AACSC’s website and your email for announcements on the upcoming courses.

Before finishing up here, we want to thank all of our vendors who continue to sponsor our events and continue giving us the best workmanship in the business — we could not do it without you!

Thank you so much for giving me this opportunity to lead the AACSC—please, come work alongside us — we can really help each other a lot in 2018!


Limited Housing Supply and Costs



Rental property owners and developers are easy targets to blame for California’s newest round of housing affordability issues and shortages. It is unfortunate because the misguided blame may lead to significantly harsher regulations over the industry in the coming years—regulations that will likely serve to perpetuate and exacerbate the problem in the long run.

California’s Housing Shortage and Affordability Problems

The problem is well documented. California does not have enough housing to meet demand. In fact, according to a recent independent report by the State’s Legislative Analyst’s Office, the State produces 100,000 fewer housing units than is needed to meet demand.1 Supply and demand economics are therefore in full force here in the State. When everyone is competing for the same limited supply of housing, costs are going to go up.

But supply and demand is not the only driving force creating affordability and shortage problems. Community resistance to housing, stringent environmental policies, lack of fiscal incentives for local governments to approve housing, limited land, lack of incentives for developers to build, burden some government regulations, long and difficult permitting process, and the high cost of building all serve to constrain new housing construction.2

And it is not just the popular and dense coastal urban areas of California that are impacted by the current shortage. As people get priced out of major cities, they begin to migrate inland; ultimately creating a supply and demand problem that in creases housing costs, rents, and prices in sub urban and other inland areas.

The shortage and affordability issues create widespread problems for all Californians, and those seeking to move here. Rents become unaffordable for more and more people. People are forced to move further away from where they work, or move out of state completely. It discourages people from living in California, which not only impacts the State’s economy, it keeps California businesses from attracting the most qualified people to work for them. Rental property owners also feel the squeeze because local governments and State lawmakers begin passing laws aimed at regulating the rental and construction industries.

What the Experts Recommend

In 2015, the Legislative Analyst Office (LAO) provided recommendations to the California Legislature about how to begin addressing California’s housing issues. In sum, it told the Legislature that it needed to pass laws to help facilitate the development of market rate housing in coastal areas. The LAO followed up with a report in 2016 after certain tenant advocacy groups expressed concerns that building market rate housing will not help low-income tenants, and that the Legislature should focus on regulations that help low-income tenants, such as stronger rent controls. The LAO’s response was swift and clear:

“Many housing programs—vouchers, rent control, and inclusionary housing—attempt to make housing more affordable without increasing the overall supply of housing. This approach does very little to address the underlying cause of California’s high housing costs: a housing shortage. Any approach that does not address the state’s housing shortage faces the following problems.”3

The LOA went on to state voucher programs, rent control and inclusionary housing programs only help select few, while doing nothing in terms of addressing the real problems. Forcing rental property owners to provide below market rate does not reduce or eliminate competition, the driv ing force of supply and demand economics. More over, forcing owners and developers to provide below market rate rentals ultimately discourages development and improvement of rental property.

Government’s Reaction to the Housing Problems

So how have the State and local governments responded to the housing shortage? To begin with, in 2017, the Legislature introduced over 130 housing related bills, nearly 50 percent more than typical legislative years. Among the bills are ones that help generate funding to build affordable housing and remove obstacles to development. Then there are the ones that seek to regulate the rental property ownership and development industry.

On the supply side, a few bills are aimed at increasing funding to build affordable housing. ACA 11 (Caballero) imposes a quarter per cent sales tax to generate yearly funding for middle-income earner housing. SB 3 (Beall) is a 3-billion-dollar one-time State general obligation bond to build and rehabilitate low-income housing. SB 2 (Atkins) would impose a $75 fee on all real estate recordings (with the notable exception that the fee would not apply to a single-family home sale), which in turn would generate a regular stream of funding for affordable housing. While these bills promote development of housing, none of them increase market rate housing.

On the regulation side, there appears to be a target on the backs of rental property owners, managers and developers. Both on the State and local level, rent control is on the agenda. Despite consensus among experts that rent control does nothing to solve the State’s housing supply problems, and actually leads to the development of fewer homes, and homes remaining off the market, lawmakers continue to target rental property owners for regulation. AB 1506 (Bloom) is probably the worst bill in years.

It essentially allows all cities and counties in the State to adopt the strictest forms of rent control on all types of housing. Currently, under the Costa-Hawkins Act of 1995, newly constructed units and single-family homes are protected from rent control. Moreover, owners of controlled units are able to raise rents to market rate when a vacancy occurs.

Bloom’s bill would remove all of those protections, allowing local governments to control even vacant units (a form of rent control called “vacancy control”). Owners would be required to keep their rents artificially below markets forever.

Rent control, especially the most severe kind like vacancy control, makes building rental units cost prohibitive. Owners cannot make money off of them, so investors stop investing. Owners of current rental units eventually get out of the rental business because renting property be comes unprofitable. Ultimately, rent control increases the housing shortage problem, which then in creases competition and costs, and makes housing even more unaffordable. It also encourages legislative bodies to adopt additional restrictions on rental properties.

Assembly Member Bloom has since pulled his bill back for this year, but promised to bring it back next year with some amendments.

Several members of the Legislature that seek to repeal the Costa-Hawkins Act or amend the Act to severely injure the important aspects of the Act join Assembly Member Bloom. Tenant groups are using AB 1506 as a plat form to organize and demand changes in several laws.

Inclusionary housing mandates are also back on the table. Inclusionary housing mandates force developers to build affordable housing units as part of a larger market rate development without the requirement of the government providing density bonuses or sufficient cost offsets. Without offsets, the costs associated with the “affordable units” are borne by the property owner and possibly the other tenants.

Again, the more burdensome development is, the less investors are inclined to develop. These kinds of mandates, as noted by the LAO, do nothing to address the housing shortage.

Locally, there are several communities considering adopting rent control regulations to address affordability issues. Rent control is a hot topic, promoted by well-organized tenant advocacy groups. It will continue to be discussed, and ultimately, some communities will cave. Communities that ordinarily would not have given a second thought to regulation a few years ago have recently considered rent control. Concord and Burlingame are just two of many examples that considered rent control. Other cities are “strengthening” rent control laws.

This past April, the City of Long Beach considered adopting an ordinance that would permit every tenant to use the same credit report for 90 days. One significant explanation to adopt the ordinance is the cost of credit reports is simply too expensive.

If rent control and inclusionary housing mandates have not captured your interest, the State administration, notably the Department of Fair Employment and Housing Council (DFEHC) has proposed three significant regulations that should affect every property owner and manager.

Occupancy limits have not changed in decades. If the DFEH draft regulation becomes law, owners and managers could not discriminate against tenants that want 15 occupants in a three-bedroom, nine occupants in a two-bedroom, and six occupants in a one-bedroom rental unit. Owners would no longer be permitted to advertise that a rental unit has a living room, dining room, and kitchenette because those rooms could be used as a bedroom.

The second draft regulation would sharply limit an owner’s/manager’s ability to refuse to rent to previously convicted felons. Our concerns are legitimate.

We are liable and subject to forfeiture and nuisance abatement laws for criminal activity on our property; we have the “unequivocal” right to deny registered sex offenders to “protect a person at risk or for some other reason.” We have the legal duty and moral obligation to keep tenants and property safe. And on top of all of this we would be required to understand how to consider a new legal standard… we would have to establish a legally-sufficient justification relating to criminal history information by proving that our screening standards are substantial and legitimate and nondiscriminatory without any guidance as to what those terms mean. We would even be required to understand the “nature and severity” and the appropriate amount of time that has passed since conviction and we are not given any specific guidance as to what those factors mean.

Finally, one very topical issue DFEHC is considering is adopting a regulation concerning emotional support animals. Unfortunately, the proposed regulation does not curb rampant support animal fraud. It does not adequately address verification requirements including: 1) assessment by a licensed medical or mental health professional; a prescription by a licensed professional; the need for the animal does not need to be current; and 2) the verification process does not discuss what additional information an owner can ask for and from what sources. The vagueness is concerning because of risk of asking the wrong question and the potential for a discrimination lawsuit. We are also very concerned that the draft regulations do not adequately consider the quiet enjoyment of other tenants, nuisance issues, and the safety and health of other tenants.

Rent control, price control, affordable housing mandates for new housing, tenant screening, use (or abuse) of credit reports, and occupancy limits represent just some of the major issues we are confronted with today. We hope you will join us in supporting the industry.

As one notable industry leader has said: join us at the table or you will be on the table.

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