Dear Maintenance Men

Mold and Interior Doors

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Dear Maintenance Men:

I have a green mold problem on the vinyl siding of the building. It was installed in 2013 by a reputable home services company. A year later the mold started to appear in the bottom of the siding, and today it is spreading to the top of the two-story house. Luckily it is only on the north side of the house. It is rather unsightly and unhealthy to have the green mold on the siding. What do I do to clean it off and keep it off? Would a good coat of paint help to keep the mold off? Thank you.

James

Dear James:

The magic words in your question are “North Side of the House!” If you ever go into the forest, you might notice moss growing on the north side of the most trees. That is because the forest is moist, and the north side does not get a great deal of sunlight to dry out the bark of the tree. The same can be happening at your property. First check the landscape sprinklers on that side of the building. They might be running too long, hitting the side of the wall, or the vegetation is too close to the property and not allowing proper air circulation. Mold, moss and algae grow well in moist and wet envi ronments. The way to clean the siding is to use a mixture of water, bleach and deter gent. Use a pump up sprayer or hose sprayer bottle. Mix 1/3 laundry deter gent, 2/3 household cleaner (409 cleaner) one quart of laundry bleach and a gallon of water. (Do not mix bleach and ammonia.) Using a pump sprayer or hose sprayer, start from the top of the wall and soak the siding with the solution. (Be sure to cover any plants, vege tation, trees etc. with plastic sheet ing to protect them from the bleach solution.) Let the solution soak on the siding for ten minutes. Using a garden hose, rinse the siding starting for top to bottom. This process may need to be repeated until the wall is clean.

An alternative to bleach: use white vinegar and baking soda mixed with water—1/3 white vinegar to 2/3 water with a generous amount of baking soda to add grit to the solution. This method requires a more hands-on approach using a scrub brush and physically scrubbing the vinyl siding until clean. To keep the mold/moss/mildew from returning, remove what is causing moisture to build up on that side of the property. After cleaning, one could paint with a mold-killing primer such as Zinsser primer and paint the siding. However, the whole point of vinyl siding is to eliminate painting!

Dear Maintenance Men:

My husband and I are installing new interior doors in our vacant unit. My understanding is using pre-hung doors is better and easier, but my husband insists that buying a door slab is cheaper and faster. We’ve never installed doors before and want to do it right the first time.

Maurine

Dear Maurine:

We have found that there are no two doors hung alike. They are all unique to their doorways. Let’s start with your husband’s plan. When buying a slab door, it does not have a hole for the door knob or latch; it also does not have the hinges at tached. It might take a master carpenter to fit the door perfectly, or the door frame might not be square, which means you will need to trim the door to fit the opening. You will find that getting the hinges to line up with the existing hinges on the jamb is not an easy feat. You also need a special tool to drill the door knob hole and latch. It might take you a few doors to get it right, negating the savings of buying a slab door.

Now, Maurine, your plan is to buy a pre-hung door. As you might guess, we recommend buying a prehung door. For those who don’t know what a pre-hung door is, let us explain. The pre-hung door comes as a complete door, including jambs, trim, hinges, doorknob and latch holes etc. The pre-hung door comes as a package with the jambs already square to the door. At first glance, a pre-hung door might look like a lot more work, but it is not. A prehung door can be installed by a novice easily the first time and is much faster than trying to wrestle with a slab door. After removing the old door jamb and trim and exposing the rough opening, insert the pre-hung door into the rough opening. Using a level, plumb and level the hinge side of the jamb using shims and gently nail the hinge side of the jamb in place. Level the top of the jamb using shims and nail into place. Using shims on the doorknob side of the jamb, be sure the door opens freely and closes without binding and nail the jamb in place. Most pre-hung doors come with the trim in place. The trim can now be nailed, and use caulking around the trim to hide any gaps that might be present. Paint, install the knob and you are done. Installation tip: Do not disassemble the pre-hung door package. Install it as it came from the hardware store. The ridged packaging will help in keeping everything square while you install the door.




Dear Apartment Owners and Managers:

We are getting close to the holidays, which means more people at your apartment buildings. Chances are, some of those residents will be inviting guests for dinner over the coming holidays. For some of these residents, this will be the first time this year they will turn on the oven! What are the odds you are just starting your own dinner or you are sitting down with your own guests when an emergency call comes to you on Thanksgiving Day from one of your residents? That call might be about a clogged sink or non-working oven with an apartment full of guests waiting for dinner. This scenario can ruin both your and your residents’ holiday. The answer is: Preventive Maintenance.

Remember, the holiday season starts with Halloween, and the demand on your properties only gets worse from there. Check each stove and oven for proper operation. Many residents only turn on their ovens at this time of year, and the problem may be as simple as a pilot light being out. Also, check the oven’s temperature calibration with an oven thermometer. This time of year sees a higher-than normal use of the plumbing, so it may be a good idea to snake out or hydro-jet your main plumbing lines. Also, sending a note to each tenant on the proper use of the garbage disposal will be useful. Note what they should and should not put down the disposal unit. A few items to include on this “No No” list are: banana peels, potato skins, coffee grounds and any stringy food. Also make sure they turn on the water before using the disposer and put down small amounts of food at a time. Instruct your residents not to use the disposal as a trash can and then turn it on when full because it will clog.

______________________________________________

WE NEED Maintenance Questions!!! If you would like to see your maintenance question in the "Dear Maintenance Men" column, please send in your questions to: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


If you need maintenance work or consultation for your building or project, please feel free to contact us. We are available throughout Southern California. For an appointment please call Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. at (714) 956-8371.

Frank Alvarez is licensed contractor and the Operations Director and co-owner of Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. He has been involved with apartment maintenance and construction for over 20 years. He is also a lecturer, educational instructor and Co-Chair of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County as well as being Chairman of the Product Service Counsel. Frank can be reached at (714)956-8371 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it For more information please go to: www.BuffaloMaintenance.com


Jerry L’Ecuyer is a licensed contractor and real estate broker. He is currently on the Board of Directors and Past President and past Chairman of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County. Jerry has been involved with apartments as a professional since 1988.

Something Chalky, Wallpaper and Roofs

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Dear Maintenance Men:

I am getting geared up for painting my four-unit apartment building and noticed a “chalky” substance on my stucco and wood siding. I am concerned that painting over it may not be good and could eventually bleed through again. I tried pressure washing it and cleaning but it keeps coming back. Please help!

Ron

Dear Ron:

The “chalky” surface comes from the existing paint on the building breaking down from old age and sun damage. The pressure washing will remove some of it; however, as you have noticed, it comes back. The solution is to use a “clear chalk sealer”. It can be applied by roller, airless gun, even a garden pumpup sprayer. It is easy to use and cleans up with water. The clear chalk sealer can be found at any home improvement center or paint store.

Dear Maintenance Men,

I just inherited my parents’ building and was planning to upgrade two units on a tight budget when I discovered that 80 per cent of the walls are covered in wallpaper. I really cannot afford to remove all that wallpaper. Can I just prime and paint over it?

Jenifer

Dear Jenifer:

You can paint over the wallpaper; however, we highly recommend you do not. Painting over wallpaper will cause a number of issues. If the wallpaper is made of paper, painting may wet and loosen the glue holding the paper to the wall. This may cause the paper to sag, bubble or ripple and the seams to standout. Future removal of the paper will be greatly hindered by the new layer of paint. Painting a vinyl or washable paper (washable paper has a thin coat of plastic film or vinyl over the paper) will be difficult as the paint might not adhere to the vinyl and peel at a later date. Painting over vinyl may also cause mildew to develop under the wallpaper because of the moisture of the paint. Removing the wallpaper on a budget may require you to do some of the work as opposed to contracting it out. A solution may be as close as your local home improvement center. They carry any number of wallpaper removal tools, including renting a wallpaper removal steamer. If you still decide to paint, repair any damaged wallpaper, add adhesive to loose paper and sand down all the seams to minimize them showing through the paint. Use joint compound on textured wallpaper and to fill holes, etc. Seal the wallpaper using an oil-based sealer with an enamel undercoat. Finish by using an interior latex paint of your choice.

Dear Maintenance Men:

When is the best time to do an annual roof inspection? Can you give me some pointers on what to look for when I inspect the roof?

Tom

Dear Tom:

The best time is before it rains! However, we find summer and fall to be the most prudent times to inspect and repair the roof. In other words, don’t wait to do roofing work after the first rains of winter. The roofing contractors will be very busy and costs may go up or you may have to wait in line for the work to get done. Inspect the roof during the summer and fall and get the roofing work done before it becomes an emergency.

During the roof inspection, pay close attention to the flashing. Flashing is used to transition between the roofing material and the building or a change in roofing direction or angle. Flashing can also be found where pipes or a chimney come up through the roof. The flashing is sealed with roofing tar and water leaks can form when the sealing tar cracks or separates from the building or the flashing material. Look for curled up roof edges on composition roofs, low spots on flat roofs and bird nests in tile roofs. Check all roof drains and cut away any tree branches that are touching or overhanging the roof. While you are inspecting the roof, check the gutters. Winter storms have a way of loosening gutters and filling them with gunk thereby causing them to lose their pitch and pool water. Pooling or overflowing gutters can deteriorate fascia boards and siding.

______________________________________________

WE NEED Maintenance Questions!!! If you would like to see your maintenance question in the "Dear Maintenance Men" column, please send in your questions to: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


If you need maintenance work or consultation for your building or project, please feel free to contact us. We are available throughout Southern California. For an appointment please call Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. at (714) 956-8371.

Frank Alvarez is licensed contractor and the Operations Director and co-owner of Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. He has been involved with apartment maintenance and construction for over 20 years. He is also a lecturer, educational instructor and Co-Chair of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County as well as being Chairman of the Product Service Counsel. Frank can be reached at (714)956-8371 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it For more information please go to: www.BuffaloMaintenance.com


Jerry L’Ecuyer is a licensed contractor and real estate broker. He is currently on the Board of Directors and Past President and past Chairman of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County. Jerry has been involved with apartments as a professional since 1988.

Water Heater, Pigeons, Exterior Lighting

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Dear Maintenance Men:

I have a 100-gallon, 79,000 BTU water heater which is about five years old. The heater has trouble maintaining a normal operating temperature and the flame is yellow. I would hate to buy another heater, what do you think is wrong?

Greg

Dear Greg:


I think you have a couple of things at work here. First, let’s address the yellow flame as that might solve the entire issue. A yellow flame indicates that the burner is not getting enough air. That means there might be an obstruction from dust or cobwebs in the burner assemble. Follow the gas line into the burner assembly and note where the air comes into the burner. If there is no obstruction at the air duct, remove the gas line from the burner and inspect the gas orifice. It is not unusual to find lint or cobwebs clogging the orifice or the gas line. (Gas line between the thermostat and the burner.) With a brush clean the burner ring. The cleaning should solve the yellow flame issue and greatly improve the efficiency of the burner.

A second item to address while maintenance is being done to the water heater is to clean out the water tank. Most 100-gallon water heaters come with a clean-out port on the side of the tank. This port is for cleaning out accumulated calcium and debris from inside the tank. Depending on the hardness of the water being fed to the heater, it is not unusual to remove one or more buckets of debris. The thick deposits on the bottom of the tank greatly impact the ability of the burner to heat the water. The clean out of the tank should be done once a year. This service will greatly lengthen the life of the water heater if done on a regular basis.

Dear Maintenance Men:

Pigeons are driving me crazy! I have tried everything to get rid of the pigeons that have taken over eaves and patios at my complex. I have used fake owls, high pitch sound devices, goop to give the pigeons sticky feet and spikes everywhere. They just laugh at the spikes and walk and nest over them. Any advice will be welcome!

Jennifer

Dear Jennifer:


Although your situation is beyond this, the first line of defense is not letting pigeons get a foot hold at your property in the first place. Talk to your residents and make sure no one is feeding the pigeons! It sounds like you have tried most of the common antidotes for getting rid of established unwanted pigeon flocks. Getting rid of pigeons is a war of wills. If you give up, they will return.

The key is to make them as uncomfortable as possible and not stopping until they are gone. First thing to do is clean the area with bleach to remove any pigeon nesting smells and spraying any stubborn pigeons with a water hose over and over. If the area lends itself to be closed off, put up netting to keep the birds from entering the area. If the spikes are broken, replace with stronger ones. Check at your local farm supply or the internet for stronger, better quality spike strips. The area must be monitored constantly until the birds have found a new nesting area away from your building, and remember, this is a daily battle if the campaign is to be successful.

Dear Maintenance Men:

Do you have a recommendation for exterior lighting that will make the property stand out from its neighbors?

Jorden

Dear Jorden:


We are big fans of LED lighting and have used 120 volt half-inch LED rope light to great advantage. Install the rope light under the eaves and out of the way. From the ground the light appears to emanate out from the eaves and down the walls. The light is indirect and makes for a very interesting look. The side benefit of the rope light is not only does it look great, it sheds light in all the dark corners around the building. LED rope light is more expensive than the incandescent rope light; however, it is economical in the long run, it has a long service life and the rope does not get hot or even warm to the touch. (Although less expensive, we do not recommend incandescent rope light.)

LED rope light comes in 150-foot rolls and with the proper rectifier in place, up to 1,200 feet can be used from one electrical source. The light comes in cool white, natural white and warm white along with a variety of colors. The rope light can be installed onto a plastic track to help keep it straight and to eliminate any drooping of the rope. Remember to predrill the track before installation. LED rope light is perfect for under stairs, balconies and any where you need soft, indirect light. Keep in mind it does not throw light very far and will not light up a courtyard; it is mainly for aesthetics and it will make your building stand out!

______________________________________________

WE NEED Maintenance Questions!!! If you would like to see your maintenance question in the "Dear Maintenance Men" column, please send in your questions to: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


If you need maintenance work or consultation for your building or project, please feel free to contact us. We are available throughout Southern California. For an appointment please call Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. at (714) 956-8371.

Frank Alvarez is licensed contractor and the Operations Director and co-owner of Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. He has been involved with apartment maintenance and construction for over 20 years. He is also a lecturer, educational instructor and Co-Chair of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County as well as being Chairman of the Product Service Counsel. Frank can be reached at (714)956-8371 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it For more information please go to: www.BuffaloMaintenance.com


Jerry L’Ecuyer is a licensed contractor and real estate broker. He is currently on the Board of Directors and Past President and past Chairman of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County. Jerry has been involved with apartments as a professional since 1988.

Slab Leak, Driveway, New Washer-Dryer

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Dear Maintenance Men:

I have just repaired another slab leak. Turns out the problem was the hot water recirculation line. I’m trying to decide if I should just abandon the line and remove the circulation pump and be done with it. What harm can it do? Do I really need a hot water return line for my residential units?

John

Dear John:


First, let us demystify what a return line really is. Simply, it is a dedicated hot water line which loops from the water heater to the furthest unit and back to the cold water heater inlet. Its purpose is to maintain hot water at each tap by assistance from the circulation pump. The circulation pump constantly delivers hot water through the return line or loop. A slab leak is a water line break under the concrete floor of a building. A water pipe under a concrete floor can leak for a long time before it is noticed or it can bubble up through cracks in the concrete depending on soil conditions. The most reported type of slab leak is on the hot water side of the plumbing and along the return line of the recirculating system. The reason for the return line being the most popular leak point is because the water never stops moving and it wears away and corrodes the pipe.

We do not recommend canceling the return line and removing the pump. This will cause other unintended consequences such as a slow delivery of hot water to many of the units in the building. The lack of a pump will waste water while the residents wait for hot water to come out of the tap, which in turn will make the water heater work harder. Not only will this annoy the residents, it will cause the water heating bill to go up.

As for repair of the return line, there are a number of solutions. If the return line has chronic leaks, it is best to run a new line outside the slab. The old return is canceled at the pump and the furthest plumbing fixture in the building and the new line is installed and routed back to the water heater.

Another solution after the pipe is repaired is to limit the incoming water pressure with a pressure regulator and put a timer on the recirculation pump to operate only at peak demand times such as morning and evening. Installing a water softener system will also help keep both the hot water heater and water lines from corroding as quickly.

Dear Maintenance Men:

We are getting bids for the driveway of an apartment house. Each contractor has his own opinion about the scope of work. It becomes confusing and difficult deciding which bid is the best.

Anne

Dear Anne:


“Apples and Oranges” bids are very common and not unique to the asphalt trade.

Every contractor has different materials and suppliers which they are not only familiar with, but experienced in the application. As with any profession, a diagnosis, procedure, product and cure may vary. This is why a second opinion is always encouraged or necessary. We too often consider the “three bid” rule as a tool to compare pricing and do not delve deeper into quality, workmanship, application or other specification which can dramatically increase or decrease the costs related to our repairs.

It is best to develop a scope of work, with drawings which identify in detail the following (this will ensure all other contractors are bidding on the same scope).

  1. Areas to be covered, replaced, repaired in square feet and outlined in site plan.
  2. Clearly identified type and quantity of asphalt mix, slurry, sealer. This is very important as most asphalt is recycled and diminishes in quality.
  3. Which equipment will be used to address repairs and distribution of materials (compaction and heavy rolling equipment is key).
  4. Communicate your long-term or short-term expectations.
  5. Ask that the application warrants against “pooling or “ponding.”
  6. Look for proper compacted thickness according to load. (Example: 2.5” of laid asphalt and then compacted 2” by roller.)
  7. Monitor all work being performed to ensure the contractor is adhering to the contracted specifications. (Ask that a supervisor is always onsite.)
  8. Scrutinize the lowest bid very carefully.
  9. Require all other industry standard practices, insurance and contract language be in the agreement.
  10. Visit the www.cslb.ca.gov website for additional tips on how to protect yourself.


Dear Maintenance Men:

My multi-unit property has washer and dryer hookups in each unit. One of my residents has installed a new fancy front-loading washing machine and now the pipes are banging. This did not happen with the regular top loading machines. Not only is the noise annoying, but also I am worried this might cause a water line break. The residents love their new machine and I don’t want to tear into the walls, so what can I do to remedy the pipe banging issue?

Victor

Dear Victor:


The reason for the pipe hammering is because of a rapid opening and closing of a water valve. Most washing machines and dishwashers use a fast acting solenoid to control the water valve. The water starts and stops very suddenly causing the pipes to move. The new popular front loading washing machines also use a solenoid to control its water valves, but they open and close many times during the cleaning cycle, so the hammering is more noticeable and damaging. The simplest and least expensive remedy is to install what is called a “Mini-Rester” laundry hammer arrester. The “Mini-Rester” is installed either at the washing machine’s hot and cold valves or directly to the back of the machine’s inlet nipples. The job can be done in the time it takes to unscrew the hose from the hose bib or machine and reinstall the hose back onto the machine or hose bib with the Mini-Rester in between. These hammer arresters can be found at any hardware store and should be about $20 each. You will need one for the hot water side and one for the cold water side. The “Mini-Rester” is designed as a single fixture remedy. If the problem continues, a larger water hammer arrester will need to be installed.

______________________________________________

WE NEED Maintenance Questions!!! If you would like to see your maintenance question in the "Dear Maintenance Men" column, please send in your questions to: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


If you need maintenance work or consultation for your building or project, please feel free to contact us. We are available throughout Southern California. For an appointment please call Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. at (714) 956-8371.

Frank Alvarez is licensed contractor and the Operations Director and co-owner of Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. He has been involved with apartment maintenance and construction for over 20 years. He is also a lecturer, educational instructor and Co-Chair of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County as well as being Chairman of the Product Service Counsel. Frank can be reached at (714)956-8371 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it For more information please go to: www.BuffaloMaintenance.com


Jerry L’Ecuyer is a licensed contractor and real estate broker. He is currently on the Board of Directors and Past President and past Chairman of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County. Jerry has been involved with apartments as a professional since 1988.

Power Snakes, Water Heaters and Fiberglass Tub

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Dear Maintenance Men:

I have an opportunity to buy a small power snake for cleaning out kitchen and bathroom drains. At the rate my tenants block their drains, it should pay for itself in no time. Is this a good idea?

Dale

Dear Dale:

We understand that almost any excuse is a good reason to buy a power tool. However, most bathroom and kitchen drains can be cleared with a three-foot hand snake. The tub or shower will typically have a hair stoppage just past the tub shoe and the bathroom sink will have a toothpaste and hair stoppage in the trap before the wall. The kitchen sink will typically be stopped on the garbage disposal side because of improper usage of the disposer. If both sides of the kitchen sink are blocked, then it may be necessary to use the power snake.

Power snakes can be very dangerous. Most operate with a 3/4 to 1/2 horse motor, which packs quite a punch, especially if your finger or arm gets caught! If you buy this snake, we highly recommend that you get some training on your machine. Power drain cleaning is very much an “art” when done well. Knowing when you hit the stoppage and when the snake is snagged comes with experience. A broken snake cable in your drain system will be far more expensive than simply calling an experienced plumber when needed. Another thought is: most kitchen stoppages are caused by grease. Your snake will only temporarily clear the stoppage. Getting a company to “Hydro-Jet” your drains every year may help cure your chronic grease stoppages.

Dear Maintenance Men:

I just replaced a water heater and boy are they expensive! What are some tried and true ways to extend the life of a water heater or recommended preventive maintenance tips? Since I’m starting with a new heater I want to make this one last as long as I can.

Fred

Dear Fred:

There are a number of things you can do to extend the life of a water heater, be it gas, electric, new or old. At least once a year, plan on flushing the tank to remove calcium deposits. First shut off the gas or breaker, and let the water cool. Drain the tank and flush with a steady stream of water from the cold water inlet and let the water and debris drain from the drain valve until the water runs clear. If you have a 100 gallon or larger tank, use the clean out port to remove the calcium deposits. Removing the deposits keeps your water heater from working overtime. The more deposits in the tank, the harder the burner needs to work to keep the water hot.

Equally important is checking the “Anode Rod”. The anode rod is a long sacrificial zinc or magnesium rod that protects the metal tank from corrosion. This rod should be checked yearly and replaced every three to five years. The rod can be found at the top of the tank and is held in place by a hex bolt head. To check the rod, turn off the water supply and let the water cool. With a wrench, turn the hex bolt at the top of the tank and lift the rod out. If the rod is smooth and white in color, it is fine and can be reinserted ready to be inspected again in a year’s time. If the rod is corroded, brown or looks like a rusted nail or missing all together, it is time to replace it. Actually, it is well past time to replace it.) A new anode rod can be found at any plumbing supply house. If you have a low ceiling above the water tank, ask for a flexible rod to ease the installation. Smear Teflon pipe thread sealant on the threads of the new rod before you install it. Don’t use tape, since it can reduce the effectiveness of the rod. Keep in mind that replacing the anode rod on a regular basis (every three to five years) could easily double the life of your water heater.

Dear Maintenance Men:

How do I get a fiberglass tub clean without scratching the surface?

John

Dear John:

The nice thing about fiberglass tubs and showers is that no matter how dirty they get, they are fairly easy to clean up. Be careful not to use any abrasives on the fiberglass, such as scouring pads, steel wool or gritty cleaning solutions. “Soft Scrub” may be used sparingly on soap scum buildup. “Lime-Away” may be used for hard water mineral deposits, but read the directions and look for the fiberglass warning or approval statement.

If you have very tough stains, moisten a cloth with clean Acetone solvent or nail polish remover. Do not let the Acetone pool as it may soften the fiberglass material. Acetone and many other cleaners have very strong vapors, so it is important to ventilate the area properly. After all the cleaning is done, the fiberglass surface may be dull. Use a fiberglass conditioner and glossing paste to bring the tub or  shower back to its original condition. You can use a product called “Gel Gloss” to bring back the shine.

______________________________________________

WE NEED Maintenance Questions!!! If you would like to see your maintenance question in the "Dear Maintenance Men" column, please send in your questions to: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


If you need maintenance work or consultation for your building or project, please feel free to contact us. We are available throughout Southern California. For an appointment please call Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. at (714) 956-8371.

Frank Alvarez is licensed contractor and the Operations Director and co-owner of Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. He has been involved with apartment maintenance and construction for over 20 years. He is also a lecturer, educational instructor and Co-Chair of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County as well as being Chairman of the Product Service Counsel. Frank can be reached at (714)956-8371 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it For more information please go to: www.BuffaloMaintenance.com


Jerry L’Ecuyer is a licensed contractor and real estate broker. He is currently on the Board of Directors and Past President and past Chairman of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County. Jerry has been involved with apartments as a professional since 1988.

Contact AACSC

Apartment Association,

California Southern Cities
333 W. Broadway St., Suite 101
Long Beach, CA 90802
(562) 426-8341

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