Dear Maintenance Men

Mouse Droppings, Deadbolts, Cabinet Lighting

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Dear Maintenance Men:

How do we safely get rid of mouse droppings and nesting from a recent infestation? We have managed to get rid of the mice, but they have left behind a mess. What is the best way to handle some cleanup under the house now that they’re gone? It’s been about six months. Observed are mice fecal pellets and chewed insulation.

Kirstin

Dear Kirstin:

Mice droppings and nesting can carry the Hanta-viruses, so a bit of caution needs to be used. When you begin cleaning, it is important that you do not stir up dust by sweeping or vacuuming up droppings, urine, or nesting materials:

  • Wear rubber, latex, or vinyl gloves when cleaning urine and droppings.
  • Spray the urine and droppings with a disinfectant or a mixture of bleach and water and let it soak five minutes. The recommended concentration of bleach solution is one part bleach to ten parts water. When using a commercial disinfectant, follow the manufacturer’s instructions on the label for dilution and disinfection time.
  • Use a paper towel to pick up the urine and droppings, and dispose of the waste in the garbage.
  • After the rodent droppings and urine have been removed, disinfect items that might have been contaminated by rodents or their urine and droppings.


If you have not done this already, seal up any entryways to ensure that no rodents can get back in.

Dear Maintenance Men:

I am in the process of installing new deadbolt locks on a number of doors at my building. These doors have never been drilled for deadbolts before. The problem I’m running into is how to line up where to drill for the latch plate in the doorframe. The door is either tight against the fame or is too loose. Do you have any good tricks for getting this done?

Ken

Dear Ken:

Indeed we do. Lipstick or shoe polish is the answer. After the deadbolt lock is in stalled in the door and with the door open, extend the bolt. Now, dab the end of the bolt with lipstick or shoe polish and return the bolt to the unlocked position. Close the door and attempt to lock or extend the bolt into the frame. Open the door and on the frame should be the exact location of the latch plate bolt hole. Using a one-inch wood bit, bore a hole 1.5 inches deep. If your wife will not let you use her lipstick, here is an alternate method.

Cut a one-inch thick dowel rod three inches long, insert a small finish nail into the end of the dowel rod, and be sure to center the nail. Cut the head of the nail off. With the deadbolt lock removed from the door, insert the dowel rod into the latch hole in the door with the nail end facing out. Close the door and with your finger, push the dowel rod into the door frame. Pull the rod out and your drilling site is marked exactly. One last item, if you are doing a number of doors, it may be worth purchasing a doorknob drilling jig. It will contain all the tools needed for professional door lock drilling and installation. The kit typically costs about $30 on up; a professional version can cost between $200 & $400. If you are doing more than a few doors, buying a professional door drilling kit will pay for itself just in the time and frustration it saves.

Dear Maintenance Men:

I have started a kitchen remodeling project in my apartment building and need some ideas for under kitchen cabinet lighting. I don’t want to use fluorescent fixtures, as they are very bulky and the light is harsh.

Jackie

Dear Jackie:

Try using “rope light” for accent lighting in some units. Rope light is very flexible and has a life expectancy of 25,000 hours. It can be installed behind the lip under the upper cabinets or if you have space above the cabinet, just lay it on the top. Rope light produces a nice subdued light, not too bright. Other areas where rope light can be installed are closets, inside cabinets, in the garden (it is very tough material), under the roof eave to accent the building, etc. The problem with rope lights is that you can go crazy with it, there are so many applications. Rope light can be found at most hardware stores and it comes in rolls as long as 150 feet or in small sections of 10, 12, 24 and 48 feet. We recommend getting the LED rope light as the rope does not get hot with use.

 


 

WE NEED Maintenance Questions!!! If you would like to see your maintenance question in the "Dear Maintenance Men" column, please send in your questions to: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


If you need maintenance work or consultation for your building or project, please feel free to contact us. We are available throughout Southern California. For an appointment please call Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. at (714) 956-8371.

Frank Alvarez is licensed contractor and the Operations Director and co-owner of Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. He has been involved with apartment maintenance and construction for over 20 years. He is also a lecturer, educational instructor and Co-Chair of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County as well as being Chairman of the Product Service Counsel. Frank can be reached at (714)956-8371 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it For more information please go to: www.BuffaloMaintenance.com


Jerry L’Ecuyer is a licensed contractor and real estate broker. He is currently on the Board of Directors and Past President and past Chairman of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County. Jerry has been involved with apartments as a professional since 1988.

Damage, Hardware and Sink

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Dear Maintenance Men:

We have a Formica style kitchen counter top in a vacant unit which has knife cut damage from a previous resident. The damage is localized and the rest of the cointer top is in great shape. I really don't want to replace the top for such a small area of damage. Do you have any suggestions on repairs?

Frank

Dear Frank:

Depending on the location of the countertop damage, use a wood, tempered glass or nylon cutting board of slightly larger size than the damaged area. Draw a template on the countertop using the cutting board as a guide. Carefully cut the damage area out. Use a very fine saw to make the opening, this will keep the edges clean. The hole should not be more than one-eighth inch larger than the cutting board. This will leave a hole in your countertop the size of the cutting board. The hole may need to be reinforced and spacers added to make up for the thickness of the new board. The cutting board should either be flush to the existing surface or no more than one-eighth inch above the surface. Use good quality adhesive silicone caulk to install and seal the cutting board to the countertop. If you don't feel confident in your cutting skills, there is an alternative. The tempered glass cutting board is very thin and could be applied directly over the damaged area of the countertop. First remove any "feet" or other spacers under the cutting board. The board is clear, you may want to paint the underside to help hide the countertop damage. Clean any grease or wax from the damaged area of the countertop and apply water proof construction glue and press the glass cutting board into place. Alter the glue has cured, use a good quality silicone caulk to seal and dress the edges.

Dear Maintenance Men:

I want to update our rental units. We have painted, installed flooring and modern window coverings; now we need something to finish it off. Any help will be welcome!

Hank

Dear Hank:

A great way to update older and modern units is to upgrade the cabinet knobs, interior door knobs and hinges. Typically apartment or builder grade knobs and hinges are rather utilitarian in nature. They get the job done and that is about it- nothing fancy. That missing certain "je ne sais quoi" in a remodeled unit can be found in the choice of knobs and hinges you install. A wise choice is a lever style knob for interior doors. They come in many different finishes and colors and they not only look attractive and modern, they are user-friendly for any disabled or older residents. The use of solid brass knobs adds a bit of weight to a door making it appear rich and sophisticated. Stainless steel knobs, pulls and hinges can make any cabinet look more modern and rich. Check at your local home improvement center for ideas along with these brand names to look for: West lock, Hamilton Sinkler, Schlage, Baldwin, or Kwikset.

Dear Maintenance Men:

I have a bathroom sink that is slow draining. I have already snaked the drain and found no stoppage. When I remove the pop·up assembly and have an open drain, water whooshes down with no problem. However, with the pop-up in place, water backs up into the sink and drains very slowly.

Paul

Dear Paul:

Most bathroom sinks have an overflow hole near the top edge of the sink. This hole serves two purposes: (1) Acts as a safety drain to keep the sink from overflowing should the water rise above a certain level in the sink; (2) The overflow hole also serves as an air vent for the sink when the water levels are above the pop-up plug. The overflow hole allows air to escape through the drain and the water to evacuate more efficiently.

What has happened is hair, toothpaste, grime, etc., have built up and sealed off the overflow drain where it exits just below the pop-up assembly plug. Most snakes are too big to go through the overflow drain. Alternatively, a speedometer cable will work great or even a long zip tie will work. Push the cable or zip tie down through the overflow hole at the top of the sink and push any gunk out into the drain. Use water to help push the debris out the overflow drain; a funnel works great to direct a good flow of water.

If you cannot access the overflow to drain, you will need to disassemble t he main drain assembly to gain access to the overflow drain exit. Once the overflow drain has good airflow, the sink should drain a bit taster. If this does not solve the problem completely, look at rest ricting the water flow coming out of the faucet. Use a restrictive aerator to cut down on the GPM of the faucet.



Dear Apartment Owners and Managers:

The upcoming holidays also mean more people than usual walking on your property. Is your property safe'? What are some of the liabilities to worry about? Check t rip and fall hazards. Do you have sprinkler heads sticking up above the grass or landscape near sidewalks? Use pop-up heads to solve this problem. L-0ok for sidewalks that have been pushed up by tree roots. This can be solved with a concrete gr inder or replacement of the section and removal of the tree root.

Cut any low hanging tree branches and look for branches that may break in heavy winter wind or rain. Check your decking (or cracks or damage and inspect the exterior stairways for wear and tear. Inspect all your garage door springs, winter wind and rain may make them heavy causing the door to close or fall unexpectedly. As a precaution, always replace both garage springs at the same time and throw away any used springs. Never install used garage springs. Check all property lighting and timers. Remember: Preventive Maintenance is cheaper than Emergency Maintenance!


 

WE NEED Maintenance Questions!!! If you would like to see your maintenance question in the "Dear Maintenance Men" column, please send in your questions to: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


If you need maintenance work or consultation for your building or project, please feel free to contact us. We are available throughout Southern California. For an appointment please call Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. at (714) 956-8371.

Frank Alvarez is licensed contractor and the Operations Director and co-owner of Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. He has been involved with apartment maintenance and construction for over 20 years. He is also a lecturer, educational instructor and Co-Chair of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County as well as being Chairman of the Product Service Counsel. Frank can be reached at (714)956-8371 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it For more information please go to: www.BuffaloMaintenance.com


Jerry L’Ecuyer is a licensed contractor and real estate broker. He is currently on the Board of Directors and Past President and past Chairman of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County. Jerry has been involved with apartments as a professional since 1988.

Mold and Interior Doors

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Dear Maintenance Men:

I have a green mold problem on the vinyl siding of the building. It was installed in 2013 by a reputable home services company. A year later the mold started to appear in the bottom of the siding, and today it is spreading to the top of the two-story house. Luckily it is only on the north side of the house. It is rather unsightly and unhealthy to have the green mold on the siding. What do I do to clean it off and keep it off? Would a good coat of paint help to keep the mold off? Thank you.

James

Dear James:

The magic words in your question are “North Side of the House!” If you ever go into the forest, you might notice moss growing on the north side of the most trees. That is because the forest is moist, and the north side does not get a great deal of sunlight to dry out the bark of the tree. The same can be happening at your property. First check the landscape sprinklers on that side of the building. They might be running too long, hitting the side of the wall, or the vegetation is too close to the property and not allowing proper air circulation. Mold, moss and algae grow well in moist and wet envi ronments. The way to clean the siding is to use a mixture of water, bleach and deter gent. Use a pump up sprayer or hose sprayer bottle. Mix 1/3 laundry deter gent, 2/3 household cleaner (409 cleaner) one quart of laundry bleach and a gallon of water. (Do not mix bleach and ammonia.) Using a pump sprayer or hose sprayer, start from the top of the wall and soak the siding with the solution. (Be sure to cover any plants, vege tation, trees etc. with plastic sheet ing to protect them from the bleach solution.) Let the solution soak on the siding for ten minutes. Using a garden hose, rinse the siding starting for top to bottom. This process may need to be repeated until the wall is clean.

An alternative to bleach: use white vinegar and baking soda mixed with water—1/3 white vinegar to 2/3 water with a generous amount of baking soda to add grit to the solution. This method requires a more hands-on approach using a scrub brush and physically scrubbing the vinyl siding until clean. To keep the mold/moss/mildew from returning, remove what is causing moisture to build up on that side of the property. After cleaning, one could paint with a mold-killing primer such as Zinsser primer and paint the siding. However, the whole point of vinyl siding is to eliminate painting!

Dear Maintenance Men:

My husband and I are installing new interior doors in our vacant unit. My understanding is using pre-hung doors is better and easier, but my husband insists that buying a door slab is cheaper and faster. We’ve never installed doors before and want to do it right the first time.

Maurine

Dear Maurine:

We have found that there are no two doors hung alike. They are all unique to their doorways. Let’s start with your husband’s plan. When buying a slab door, it does not have a hole for the door knob or latch; it also does not have the hinges at tached. It might take a master carpenter to fit the door perfectly, or the door frame might not be square, which means you will need to trim the door to fit the opening. You will find that getting the hinges to line up with the existing hinges on the jamb is not an easy feat. You also need a special tool to drill the door knob hole and latch. It might take you a few doors to get it right, negating the savings of buying a slab door.

Now, Maurine, your plan is to buy a pre-hung door. As you might guess, we recommend buying a prehung door. For those who don’t know what a pre-hung door is, let us explain. The pre-hung door comes as a complete door, including jambs, trim, hinges, doorknob and latch holes etc. The pre-hung door comes as a package with the jambs already square to the door. At first glance, a pre-hung door might look like a lot more work, but it is not. A prehung door can be installed by a novice easily the first time and is much faster than trying to wrestle with a slab door. After removing the old door jamb and trim and exposing the rough opening, insert the pre-hung door into the rough opening. Using a level, plumb and level the hinge side of the jamb using shims and gently nail the hinge side of the jamb in place. Level the top of the jamb using shims and nail into place. Using shims on the doorknob side of the jamb, be sure the door opens freely and closes without binding and nail the jamb in place. Most pre-hung doors come with the trim in place. The trim can now be nailed, and use caulking around the trim to hide any gaps that might be present. Paint, install the knob and you are done. Installation tip: Do not disassemble the pre-hung door package. Install it as it came from the hardware store. The ridged packaging will help in keeping everything square while you install the door.




Dear Apartment Owners and Managers:

We are getting close to the holidays, which means more people at your apartment buildings. Chances are, some of those residents will be inviting guests for dinner over the coming holidays. For some of these residents, this will be the first time this year they will turn on the oven! What are the odds you are just starting your own dinner or you are sitting down with your own guests when an emergency call comes to you on Thanksgiving Day from one of your residents? That call might be about a clogged sink or non-working oven with an apartment full of guests waiting for dinner. This scenario can ruin both your and your residents’ holiday. The answer is: Preventive Maintenance.

Remember, the holiday season starts with Halloween, and the demand on your properties only gets worse from there. Check each stove and oven for proper operation. Many residents only turn on their ovens at this time of year, and the problem may be as simple as a pilot light being out. Also, check the oven’s temperature calibration with an oven thermometer. This time of year sees a higher-than normal use of the plumbing, so it may be a good idea to snake out or hydro-jet your main plumbing lines. Also, sending a note to each tenant on the proper use of the garbage disposal will be useful. Note what they should and should not put down the disposal unit. A few items to include on this “No No” list are: banana peels, potato skins, coffee grounds and any stringy food. Also make sure they turn on the water before using the disposer and put down small amounts of food at a time. Instruct your residents not to use the disposal as a trash can and then turn it on when full because it will clog.

______________________________________________

WE NEED Maintenance Questions!!! If you would like to see your maintenance question in the "Dear Maintenance Men" column, please send in your questions to: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


If you need maintenance work or consultation for your building or project, please feel free to contact us. We are available throughout Southern California. For an appointment please call Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. at (714) 956-8371.

Frank Alvarez is licensed contractor and the Operations Director and co-owner of Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. He has been involved with apartment maintenance and construction for over 20 years. He is also a lecturer, educational instructor and Co-Chair of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County as well as being Chairman of the Product Service Counsel. Frank can be reached at (714)956-8371 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it For more information please go to: www.BuffaloMaintenance.com


Jerry L’Ecuyer is a licensed contractor and real estate broker. He is currently on the Board of Directors and Past President and past Chairman of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County. Jerry has been involved with apartments as a professional since 1988.

Something Chalky, Wallpaper and Roofs

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Dear Maintenance Men:

I am getting geared up for painting my four-unit apartment building and noticed a “chalky” substance on my stucco and wood siding. I am concerned that painting over it may not be good and could eventually bleed through again. I tried pressure washing it and cleaning but it keeps coming back. Please help!

Ron

Dear Ron:

The “chalky” surface comes from the existing paint on the building breaking down from old age and sun damage. The pressure washing will remove some of it; however, as you have noticed, it comes back. The solution is to use a “clear chalk sealer”. It can be applied by roller, airless gun, even a garden pumpup sprayer. It is easy to use and cleans up with water. The clear chalk sealer can be found at any home improvement center or paint store.

Dear Maintenance Men,

I just inherited my parents’ building and was planning to upgrade two units on a tight budget when I discovered that 80 per cent of the walls are covered in wallpaper. I really cannot afford to remove all that wallpaper. Can I just prime and paint over it?

Jenifer

Dear Jenifer:

You can paint over the wallpaper; however, we highly recommend you do not. Painting over wallpaper will cause a number of issues. If the wallpaper is made of paper, painting may wet and loosen the glue holding the paper to the wall. This may cause the paper to sag, bubble or ripple and the seams to standout. Future removal of the paper will be greatly hindered by the new layer of paint. Painting a vinyl or washable paper (washable paper has a thin coat of plastic film or vinyl over the paper) will be difficult as the paint might not adhere to the vinyl and peel at a later date. Painting over vinyl may also cause mildew to develop under the wallpaper because of the moisture of the paint. Removing the wallpaper on a budget may require you to do some of the work as opposed to contracting it out. A solution may be as close as your local home improvement center. They carry any number of wallpaper removal tools, including renting a wallpaper removal steamer. If you still decide to paint, repair any damaged wallpaper, add adhesive to loose paper and sand down all the seams to minimize them showing through the paint. Use joint compound on textured wallpaper and to fill holes, etc. Seal the wallpaper using an oil-based sealer with an enamel undercoat. Finish by using an interior latex paint of your choice.

Dear Maintenance Men:

When is the best time to do an annual roof inspection? Can you give me some pointers on what to look for when I inspect the roof?

Tom

Dear Tom:

The best time is before it rains! However, we find summer and fall to be the most prudent times to inspect and repair the roof. In other words, don’t wait to do roofing work after the first rains of winter. The roofing contractors will be very busy and costs may go up or you may have to wait in line for the work to get done. Inspect the roof during the summer and fall and get the roofing work done before it becomes an emergency.

During the roof inspection, pay close attention to the flashing. Flashing is used to transition between the roofing material and the building or a change in roofing direction or angle. Flashing can also be found where pipes or a chimney come up through the roof. The flashing is sealed with roofing tar and water leaks can form when the sealing tar cracks or separates from the building or the flashing material. Look for curled up roof edges on composition roofs, low spots on flat roofs and bird nests in tile roofs. Check all roof drains and cut away any tree branches that are touching or overhanging the roof. While you are inspecting the roof, check the gutters. Winter storms have a way of loosening gutters and filling them with gunk thereby causing them to lose their pitch and pool water. Pooling or overflowing gutters can deteriorate fascia boards and siding.

______________________________________________

WE NEED Maintenance Questions!!! If you would like to see your maintenance question in the "Dear Maintenance Men" column, please send in your questions to: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


If you need maintenance work or consultation for your building or project, please feel free to contact us. We are available throughout Southern California. For an appointment please call Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. at (714) 956-8371.

Frank Alvarez is licensed contractor and the Operations Director and co-owner of Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. He has been involved with apartment maintenance and construction for over 20 years. He is also a lecturer, educational instructor and Co-Chair of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County as well as being Chairman of the Product Service Counsel. Frank can be reached at (714)956-8371 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it For more information please go to: www.BuffaloMaintenance.com


Jerry L’Ecuyer is a licensed contractor and real estate broker. He is currently on the Board of Directors and Past President and past Chairman of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County. Jerry has been involved with apartments as a professional since 1988.

Water Heater, Pigeons, Exterior Lighting

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Dear Maintenance Men:

I have a 100-gallon, 79,000 BTU water heater which is about five years old. The heater has trouble maintaining a normal operating temperature and the flame is yellow. I would hate to buy another heater, what do you think is wrong?

Greg

Dear Greg:


I think you have a couple of things at work here. First, let’s address the yellow flame as that might solve the entire issue. A yellow flame indicates that the burner is not getting enough air. That means there might be an obstruction from dust or cobwebs in the burner assemble. Follow the gas line into the burner assembly and note where the air comes into the burner. If there is no obstruction at the air duct, remove the gas line from the burner and inspect the gas orifice. It is not unusual to find lint or cobwebs clogging the orifice or the gas line. (Gas line between the thermostat and the burner.) With a brush clean the burner ring. The cleaning should solve the yellow flame issue and greatly improve the efficiency of the burner.

A second item to address while maintenance is being done to the water heater is to clean out the water tank. Most 100-gallon water heaters come with a clean-out port on the side of the tank. This port is for cleaning out accumulated calcium and debris from inside the tank. Depending on the hardness of the water being fed to the heater, it is not unusual to remove one or more buckets of debris. The thick deposits on the bottom of the tank greatly impact the ability of the burner to heat the water. The clean out of the tank should be done once a year. This service will greatly lengthen the life of the water heater if done on a regular basis.

Dear Maintenance Men:

Pigeons are driving me crazy! I have tried everything to get rid of the pigeons that have taken over eaves and patios at my complex. I have used fake owls, high pitch sound devices, goop to give the pigeons sticky feet and spikes everywhere. They just laugh at the spikes and walk and nest over them. Any advice will be welcome!

Jennifer

Dear Jennifer:


Although your situation is beyond this, the first line of defense is not letting pigeons get a foot hold at your property in the first place. Talk to your residents and make sure no one is feeding the pigeons! It sounds like you have tried most of the common antidotes for getting rid of established unwanted pigeon flocks. Getting rid of pigeons is a war of wills. If you give up, they will return.

The key is to make them as uncomfortable as possible and not stopping until they are gone. First thing to do is clean the area with bleach to remove any pigeon nesting smells and spraying any stubborn pigeons with a water hose over and over. If the area lends itself to be closed off, put up netting to keep the birds from entering the area. If the spikes are broken, replace with stronger ones. Check at your local farm supply or the internet for stronger, better quality spike strips. The area must be monitored constantly until the birds have found a new nesting area away from your building, and remember, this is a daily battle if the campaign is to be successful.

Dear Maintenance Men:

Do you have a recommendation for exterior lighting that will make the property stand out from its neighbors?

Jorden

Dear Jorden:


We are big fans of LED lighting and have used 120 volt half-inch LED rope light to great advantage. Install the rope light under the eaves and out of the way. From the ground the light appears to emanate out from the eaves and down the walls. The light is indirect and makes for a very interesting look. The side benefit of the rope light is not only does it look great, it sheds light in all the dark corners around the building. LED rope light is more expensive than the incandescent rope light; however, it is economical in the long run, it has a long service life and the rope does not get hot or even warm to the touch. (Although less expensive, we do not recommend incandescent rope light.)

LED rope light comes in 150-foot rolls and with the proper rectifier in place, up to 1,200 feet can be used from one electrical source. The light comes in cool white, natural white and warm white along with a variety of colors. The rope light can be installed onto a plastic track to help keep it straight and to eliminate any drooping of the rope. Remember to predrill the track before installation. LED rope light is perfect for under stairs, balconies and any where you need soft, indirect light. Keep in mind it does not throw light very far and will not light up a courtyard; it is mainly for aesthetics and it will make your building stand out!

______________________________________________

WE NEED Maintenance Questions!!! If you would like to see your maintenance question in the "Dear Maintenance Men" column, please send in your questions to: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


If you need maintenance work or consultation for your building or project, please feel free to contact us. We are available throughout Southern California. For an appointment please call Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. at (714) 956-8371.

Frank Alvarez is licensed contractor and the Operations Director and co-owner of Buffalo Maintenance, Inc. He has been involved with apartment maintenance and construction for over 20 years. He is also a lecturer, educational instructor and Co-Chair of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County as well as being Chairman of the Product Service Counsel. Frank can be reached at (714)956-8371 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it For more information please go to: www.BuffaloMaintenance.com


Jerry L’Ecuyer is a licensed contractor and real estate broker. He is currently on the Board of Directors and Past President and past Chairman of the Education Committee of the Apartment Association of Orange County. Jerry has been involved with apartments as a professional since 1988.

Contact AACSC

Apartment Association,

California Southern Cities
333 W. Broadway St., Suite 101
Long Beach, CA 90802
(562) 426-8341

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